Porsche have never lacked inspiration when looking to create yet another variant of its ever popular 911. This time the iconic 1973 ‘ducktail’ Carrera RS 2.7 has inspired the new 911 Sport Classic (So, do we consider this a new 911 ‘SC’?).

Based on the Carrera S but using the 44mm wider body from the Carrera 4S , the Sport Classic features a new double-bubble roof plus the obligatory twin stripes that were first used on the Cayman “Porsche Design Edition 1”.

Power comes from a 3.8 litre direct-injection (DFI) flat-six engine with a redesigned intake manifold featuring six vacuum-controlled flaps that increase power by 23bhp to a very tidy 408bhp. The Sport Classic’s new engine is accompanied by ceramic brakes, PASM sports supension – lowering the car by 20 millimetres – and custom-made 19-inch wheels with black-edged rims. Porsche have chosen to fit the Sport Classic with a six-speed manual transmission as standard, which befits its classic reference, and this enables it to reach a claimed top speed of 187mph while the 0-62mph sprint takes just 4.6sec.

The interior also receives an upgrade, featuring woven leather covering the newly-designed sports seats, as well as a dashboard wrapped in Espresso Nature leather, contrasting with the Sport Classic Grey exterior. These appear to be the only colour schemes available, so you’d better look closely at the pictures below before ordering.

Created by in-house coach-builders ‘Porsche Exclusive’ the Porsche 911 Sport Classic will cost €169,300 (£140,049 in the UK) when it goes on sale in January 2010, nearly twice the price of a comparably specced Carrera S.

Due to make its debut at the Frankfurt show later this month, this special edition 911 will be strictly limited to 250 lucky (i.e. wealthy) customers.


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Steve Davies

Steve is an investor, private equity advisor and former Partner at KPMG, PwC and Bain.   Most importantly he's a life-long car enthusiast, mountain biker and active sports enthusiast. He designs and builds technology platforms and is the architect behind Transmission.

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